When we see someone we care about make bad decisions, we can either confront them about it or hope someone else does. But we should ask ourselves: are we really being kind, or are we letting fear, discomfort, or indifference be the boss of us?

You don’t have to be afraid even when there’s something to be afraid of.

When we take a step back and acknowledge that part of the problem is that we’re not getting our own way, anger will no longer be the boss of us.

Envy brings arrogance when we’re winning and discouragement when we’re not. It robs us of contentment and causes us to feel like—as an ancient king put it—we’re chasing after the wind.

We are guilty, but not condemned. Our guilt can remind us of something, but not define us.

Our emotions don’t have to be the boss. In fact, Christians already have a boss—a better boss than anger, envy, insecurity, guilt, fear, or greed.

The unity and diversity of the early church shocked and intrigued the ancient world. Ours should as well. 

Our political views are shaped by a number of variables: our backgrounds, education, and personal experiences to name a few. It’s easy to feel like our view is the right one, but the person beside you is more precious to God than your political view. 

Your favorite candidate will win or lose based on how our country votes this November. However, the church will win or lose based on our behavior between now and then. 

Becoming a Christian is easy. It won't cost you anything. But Jesus never invited anyone to become a Christian. He invites us to follow. 

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App